Category Archives: Success

4 Business Strategies from World’s #1 Business Strategist

By Logan Chierotti

Every experienced businessperson understands the benefits of good mentors. The knowledge they bring can be instrumental to a founder’s development and directly spur company growth.

But what if you don’t have the network to generate a mentor that fits your current needs? Well, instead of waiting around, why not learn from the nation’s #1 business strategist.

You may have heard of him. His name is Tony Robbins.

Robbins is the ultimate life coach and an expert on business leadership. And when he’s not making participants walk on hot coals across the world at his seminars, he’s inspiring some of the biggest names in business. Robbins super fans include Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff and Paul Tudor Jones of the $13 billion hedge fund, Tudor Investment Corp.

Long story short – Tony Robbins is a good person to listen to when it comes to creating a successful business. With that in mind, it’s time to pay attention.

Here are Robbins 4 tips for building a business that lasts.

1. Focus on innovation – Innovative businesses meet the needs of their clients in a unique way. In order to be sustainable, you must continually innovate and evolve.

2. Focus on marketing – Good marketing requires that you first understand the true benefits of your product. Next, you must have a clear idea of what your customer’s actually want. With this complimentary knowledge base, you can create powerful marketing that will get your prospects attention.

3. Find your differentiation – Look hard at the market, then alter your offering to satisfy customer needs. By differentiating your offering, your business will stand out.

4. Maintain your drive – You must maintain proper motivation in order to innovate, market you product, and differentiate your offering. Building a business requires commitment, and maintaining your drive is a key component. Show up to the office every day with the same passion and energy you had when you first started.

For those of you who want to take a deeper look into his teachings, Robbins provides a number of intensive business courses such as business mastery, new money masters and mastering influence.

But don’t only rely on Robbins, or any other guru’s teachings for that matter. Even with good mentors and teachers, advice will only take you so far. More important, is the implementation of that advice.

For an added dose if inspiration, here’s a quote from Robbins about achieving great rewards in life.

“I believe life is constantly testing us for our level of commitment, and life’s greatest rewards are reserved for those who demonstrate a never-ending commitment to act until they achieve. This level of resolve can move mountains, but it must be constant and consistent.”

Now get out there, be bold, and move mountains!

Read the original article HERE 

Darwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be Too

By ALEX SOOJUNG-KIM PANG

When you examine the lives of history’s most creative figures, you are immediately confronted with a paradox: They organize their lives around their work, but not their days.

Figures as different as Charles Dickens, Henri Poincaré, and Ingmar Bergman, working in disparate fields in different times, all shared a passion for their work, a terrific ambition to succeed, and an almost superhuman capacity to focus. Yet when you look closely at their daily lives, they only spent a few hours a day doing what we would recognize as their most important work. The rest of the time, they were hiking mountains, taking naps, going on walks with friends, or just sitting and thinking. Their creativity and productivity, in other words, were not the result of endless hours of toil. Their towering creative achievements result from modest “working” hours.

How did they manage to be so accomplished? Can a generation raised to believe that 80-hour workweeks are necessary for success learn something from the lives of the people who laid the foundations of chaos theory and topology or wrote Great Expectations?

I think we can. If some of history’s greatest figures didn’t put in immensely long hours, maybe the key to unlocking the secret of their creativity lies in understanding not just how they labored but how they rested, and how the two relate.

Continue reading Darwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be Too

The 5 Seconds of Opportunity – Happening Multiple Times A Day

By LeaderTribe

This week’s video delivers very practical information the FIVE SECONDS between knowing the right thing to do and excuses entering your brain. “I’m too tired right now.” “Let me check email one more time.” “I don’t have all the information I need to make the call I don’t want to make!”

New research reveals that there are 5 SECONDS of opportunity that you will have several times per day. The people who are using this information best are being transformed. Careers are turning around, weight is being lost and marriages are being saved.

Watch the video, then get the FREE DOWNLOAD of the 3 page executive summary (adult cliff notes) for “The Power of Habit.”  If you like that summary, please just reply back to our email and we’ll send you out the 10 page summary as well!

Dr Rob

Read the original article HERE

Transform Your Words in 4 Steps

By Tony Robbins

A 10-DAY CHALLENGE THAT WILL BREAK DESTRUCTIVE, HABITUAL VOCABULARY

“Extraordinary ways and the way we choose to do so can improve the neural functioning of the brain. In fact, a single word has the power to influence the expression of genes that regulate physical and emotional stress. If we do not continually exercise the brain’s language centers, we cripple our neurological ability to deal with the problems we encounter with each other.”

– Dr. Andrew Newberg, Words Can Change Your Brain

In a previous blog post, Change your words, change your life, we talked about how our habitual emotional vocabulary shapes and controls much of our emotional experiences in life – how the labels we put upon our experience become our experience.

Today, let’s take a look at how you can transform the quality of your entire life simply by becoming conscious of what habitual vocabulary you use for negative emotions, and shifting them with words that break your patterns and provide you with new and better emotional choices.

Your assignment is very simple: Below you’ll see my 10-day challenge. I call it “Watch Your TV,” watch your “Transformational Vocabulary.” The labels you attach to your experience can transform the way you feel. Again, it’s not hard to realize that if you habitually take any intense emotion and say it’s “depressing,” it’s going to feel very different than if you say you’re feeling a little “down.” Being enraged by somebody’s reaction is very different than being a bit frustrated by their response. Saying to yourself they utterly rejected you, is quite different than they didn’t agree with your suggestion.

The real secret to transforming your life is to wake up and become conscious of the patterns that are currently unconscious and shaping the way you feel. Continue reading Transform Your Words in 4 Steps

Compared to What?

By Seth Godin

A quick look at Yelp reviews will show you that NY restaurants are not quite as good as those in some suburbs.

This, of course, makes no sense. New York is insanely competitive, with a ton of turnover and a very demanding audience. A fast casual restaurant in Shaker Heights can coast for a long time, because… it’s better than the alternatives.

Thanks to marketing, the media and our culture, we spend a lot of our time comparing before we decide whether or not we’re happy.

Turn back the clock just 60 years. If you lived in 1957, how would your life compare to the one you live right now? Well, you have access to lifesaving medicines, often in pill form. You can choose from an infinite amount of entertainment, you can connect with humans all over the Earth, for free, at the click of a button. You have access to the sum total of human knowledge. You have control over your reproductive cycle. You can eat sushi (you’ve even heard of sushi). You can express yourself in a thousand ways that were forbidden then…

That’s in one lifetime.

But we don’t compare our lives to this imaginary juxtaposition. Instead, we hear two things from the media we choose to engage with: Other people have it better, way better. And, it’s going to get worse. Add to that the idea that marketers want us to believe that what we have now isn’t that good, but if we merely choose to go into a bit of debt, we can buy our way to a better outcome…

Comparison leads to frustration which sometimes leads to innovation.

More often than not, though, frustration doesn’t make us happy. It only makes us frustrated.

If a comparison isn’t helping you get to where you’re going, it’s okay to ignore it.

Humanity: Quotes collected by Tom Peters

By Tom Peters

“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”—Mary Oliver

“If you ask me what I have come to do in this world, I who am an artist, I will reply: I am here to live my life out loud.”—Émile Zola

(Get the PDF)

“[The novel] traced the very ordinary life of a very ordinary woman—a life with few moments of high drama, but which was also remarkable. The extraordinary in the ordinary. It was a theme I often discussed with my students—how we can never consider anybody’s life ‘ordinary,’ how every human existence is a novel with its own compelling narrative. Even if, on the surface, it seems prosaic, the fact remains that each individual life is charged with contradictions and complexities. And no matter much we wish to keep things simple and uneventful, we cannot help but collide with mess. It is our destiny—because mess, the drama we create for ourselves, is an intrinsic part of being alive.”
—Hannah, from State of the Union by Douglas Kennedy

“Make each day a Masterpiece!”—John Wooden

“Make your life itself a creative work of art.”—Mike Ray, The Highest Goal

“Nobody can prevent you from choosing to be exceptional.”—Mark Sanborn, The Fred Factor

“The only thing you have power over is to get good at what you do. That’s all there is; there ain’t no more!”
—Sally Field Continue reading Humanity: Quotes collected by Tom Peters

The 9 Behaviors of Great Leaders

By Leading Blog

EASY PROBLEMS can often be solved by guessing. And we solve hundreds of these kinds of problems as we go throughout our week. The problem arises when we rely on our experience to guess at what might be wrong to try to solve hard problems—problems where the solution is obscured. The odds are against solving hard problems by guessing. And because we don’t apply the right approach to these problems they remain unsolved costing us time, money, and emotional wellbeing.

Naturally we like simple solutions. But a simple guess is not the same thing as a simple solution. A simple solution is easy to implement. But a simple guess that doesn’t get to the real issues is difficult, expensive, and wasteful to implement.

We need to stop guessing. “Every unsolved problem is bottlenecked by not understanding the root cause at a fundamental level.” In Stop Guessing, Nat Greene explains 9 behaviors that great problem-solvers use to solve hard problems. Here are his behavior summaries:

1. Stop Guessing
It’s natural for us to guess. The first thing you must do to start solving problems or keep from making them worse is to stop guessing.

2. Smell the Problem
Get out and walk around using your natural senses and tools available to you to develop a strong pattern of failure. Ask relevant, thought-provoking questions about the specific problem to guide you to collect information and look for very specific patterns, rather than shotgunning and looking at everything in the system.

3. Embrace You Ignorance
It’s what you don’t know that lies between you and the solution. Great problem-solvers not only admit their ignorance but also embrace it and ask questions others might find “stupid,” to shatter old assumptions about the problem.

4. Know What Problem you’re Solving
Often, people work on the wrong problem entirely by making some implicit assumption about what’s causing it. Great problem-solvers invest time upfront to make sure the problem they’re working on is well defined, measureable as a variable, and represents precisely what is wrong with the system or process.

5. Dig into the Fundamentals
This means learning how the process works, both by understanding the process itself and by understanding some of the fundamental science behind it. By focusing on what controls a problem, you’ll be able to limit your digging to the parts of the process and the science that are relevant, rather than trying to wrap your arms around the entire thing at once.

6. Don’t Rely on Experts
Utilizing subject-matter experts is crucial to understanding a complex system and its underlying functionality and science. Unfortunately, most people delegate responsibility for solving the problem to those subject-matter experts, rather than driving the problem-solving process themselves. Great problem-solvers always view experts as collaborators rather than saviors.

7. Believe in a Simple Solution
When confronting complex problems, it can be comforting to believe that the solution will be complex as well. But by not believing in a simple solution, people often give up long before they’ve gone through the rigor required to find the simple solution that lies at the root cause, to great cost and detriment. Great problem-solvers will have the belief and tenacity to keep solving until they’ve found the root cause.

8. Make Fact-Based Decisions
Avoid making opinion-based decisions: anything that relies on a vote, on authority, or on some subjective ranking system of what decision to make is one of these opinion-based decisions, and it leads problem-solvers astray.

9. Stay on Target
When problem-solvers dive deep into a problem, they too frequently seek to expand the number of possible root causes, so they can test them. Great problem-solvers measure the drivers that most immediately control the problem in order to determine whether those subvariables are in control, and in doing so are able to quickly eliminate most possible root causes and avenues of inquiry without having to dive deeper into them.

Greene digs deeper in to each of these in separate chapters. Strong problem-solving methods will discourage guessing, provide lots of structure to develop a pattern of failure, and guide you to understand how the process works. Begin problem solving and not solution-guessing.

Read the original article HERE

 

An ancient memorization strategy might cause lasting changes to the brain

By Rachel Becker

Weird as it might sound, there are competitive rememberers out there who can memorize a deck of cards in seconds or dozens of words in minutes. So, naturally, someone decided to study them. It turns out that practicing their techniques doesn’t just improve your memory — it can also change how your brain works.

There’s been a long-standing debate about whether memory athletes are born with superior memories, or whether their abilities are due to their training regimens. These tend to include an ancient memorization strategy called the method of loci, which involves visualizing important pieces of information placed at key stops along a mental journey. This journey can be an imaginary walk through your house or a local park, or your drive to work. The important thing is that you can mentally move back through it to retrieve the pieces of information you stored. (The ancient Greeks are said to have used it to remember important texts.)

Boris Nikolai Konrad, a memory coach and athlete who’s in the Guinness Book of World Records for memorizing 201 names and faces in just 15 minutes, chalks his superior memory abilities up to training with this and other mnemonic techniques. “It’s a sport like any other,” Konrad told The Verge. Only, he adds, “you’re not moving that much.” But practicing is key.

Continue reading An ancient memorization strategy might cause lasting changes to the brain

Why the Lowly Dandelion Is a Better Metaphor for Leaders than the Mighty Banyan

By Vivek Bapat

Banyans are among the world’s largest and longest-living trees — one in India is more than 200 years old and is reported to be the world’s largest tree. Bigger than the average Wal-Mart, it has a canopy of more than 19,000 square meters. Not surprisingly, this visual distinctiveness has come to symbolize magnificence, immortality, and stature — attributes typically associated with strong, stable leadership. Particularly, in South East Asia, where it grows, the Banyan also has deep cultural reverence. It is designated as the National Tree of India.  Leadership Institutes, conferences, and management gurus reference the mighty banyan in their teachings.

There are good reasons the metaphor is so popular. Like the banyan, many well-regarded leaders get their start by capitalizing on a nascent opportunity. Similar to the branches and roots of the banyan, they flourish by surrounding themselves with like-spirited colleagues, bonding around the core. They successfully expand their span of control outward from the center, gathering more influence over time.

However, the same attributes that spawn initial success also expose some intrinsic flaws. As the banyan’s roots grow out from the center, into what resembles a formidable trunk, it completely surrounds and suffocates the original host tree, leaving a hollow core at the center. Correspondingly, leaders who grow their influence like the great banyan can unwittingly smother the initial spark of innovation and disruptive thinking at the core of an organization’s ethos — that magic that made it successful in the first place.

As they grow, banyans seek to dominate surrounding trees, discouraging other plants to grow in the dense canopy of their leaves. In the same way, as leaders’ influence grows, success can feed into their egos, encouraging them to surround themselves exclusively with executives who constantly validate and reflect their own beliefs.  Ultimately, this type of growth masks a lack of diversity and fresh thinking in the core of the management ranks causing many leaders, their teams and organizations to lose their way.

In stark contrast to the banyan is a small weed that lives an unremarkable, fleeting life — the dandelion.

From conventional reasoning, you’d be hard pressed to find a management guru who would recommend that we lead like dandelions. But, just as improbable as it sounds, could the small, frail dandelion — a sworn pest of the suburban yard, in fact, offer a better metaphor for modern day leadership?

Further inspection reveals some interesting characteristics that correlate.  Dandelions fall under a class known as beneficial weeds, which help the plants around them. Dandelions do this by sending taproots deep into the ground. These taproots pull nutrients up to the surface, improving the quality of the soil and feeding shallow-rooted plants nearby. Dandelions also attract insects that enable pollination, like bees, which help other flowering plants. Plants that might not otherwise have a chance to germinate or survive get a shot at life because of the nutrients and insects that dandelions send their way. Yes, dandelions are prolific and fight for territory, but they don’t grow large and they fade quickly after blooming, giving other species a chance to thrive. They may not be the showiest plants, but they leave the environment a better place.

The resilient, flexible, nurturing style of the dandelion might be more emblematically better suited to today’s modern digital world and its constant change than the rigid, inflexible style of leadership reflected by the banyan. Faster than ever before, technology-led disruption is wiping out companies that rest too long on the laurels of their past success. Like the dandelion, which knows its time is short, new leaders now have months, not decades, to succeed. Like the dandelion, leaders should use a faster, agile, flexible mindset to explore and exploit new opportunities presented by constantly challenging the status-quo, even when they are growing.

A dandelion can find a way to grow with the most minimal resources; who hasn’t seen one popping up between the cracks in a concrete sidewalk? Similarly, today’s most resilient digital companies are lean and dandelion-tough. While in the past, disruptive ideas often starved and died due to lack of capital investments, today, the democratization of technology — in computing, cloud, social, and big-data analytics — let business leaders deploy, test, and scale new ideas more cheaply than before.

The banyan might seem mighty on the outside, but an old banyan has a hollow core. In a fast-changing world, leaders must preserve the personal authenticity, moral compass, and clarity that defines them, especially as their companies grow. Just as the dandelion helps other plants to flourish, leaders must focus not on expanding their own empires (in banyan-like fashion) but on allowing others to thrive. Resilient leaders choose their metaphors carefully, keep their egos in check, and leave their environments richer than they found them, clearing the way for new leaders to take root.

Humility Casts a Wide Net

By Leading Blog

HUMILITY casts a wide net and makes possible the work of leadership. Nothing facilitates community, collaboration, and innovation like humility.

In Humility is the New Smart, Ed Hess and Katherine Ludwig define humility as “a mindset about oneself that is open-minded, self-accurate, and not all about me, and that enables one to embrace the world as it is in the pursuit of human excellence.”

Their definition encompasses the mind of a leader that will be able to lead in a changing and uncertain world. Humility is inclusive. It is inclusive of others ideas, others needs, others strengths, other contributions, and the realities that exist outside of our own head. A humble leader asks more questions and is open to more answers thus deepening the pool of resources they have to draw upon. But it requires a strength of character. As senior vice president of the NBA’s Orlando Magic, Pat Williams writes in Humility: The Secret Ingredient of Success:

    • Humble leaders are strong enough to listen to other points of view.
    • Humble leaders are strong enough to admit their mistakes and learn from them.
    • Humble leaders are strong enough to celebrate their achievements of others.
  • Humble leaders are strong enough to surround themselves with talented people without feeling threatened or diminished.

Additionally,

    • Humble people treat others as equals.
    • Humble people don’t claim to know everything.
    • Humble people are better team players.
  • Humble people are willing to set aside their egos.

Humility is the antidote to insecurity that often plagues us. A lack of humility actually drives insecurity. Humility makes your strengths productive and multiplies the strengths of others. Humility acknowledges a world beyond our own thinking and minimizes our own limitations. A good leader knows this and acts accordingly to produce the best results.

Do you have the strength to be humble?

Read the original article HERE

Empowering Leaders to Lead